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The first thing I signed up for when Trump got elected was the campaign to impeach him. They've just sent me this e-mail:

Yesterday, Congressman Brad Sherman (D-CA, 30th District) and Congressman Al Green (D-TX, 9th District) introduced an Article of Impeachment (H.Res. 438) against President Trump for High Crimes and Misdemeanors. The article focuses on obstruction of justice.

We’ve reached a critical threshold in this campaign, but we have to keep working together!

How can you help?

The House Judiciary Committee must now be pressed to hold hearings on this article of impeachment, and House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte needs to hear from you.

Please call the House Judiciary Committee at (202) 225-3951. When someone answers, ask to leave a message:

Hello, my name is ____________. I am calling to urge Chairman Goodlatte to hold hearings on the Article of Impeachment introduced this week by Congressman Brad Sherman and Congressman Al Green. Our democracy is counting on the House Judiciary Committee to take action. Thank you!

To read the full Article of Impeachment introduced on Wednesday, click here.

It me

Apr. 25th, 2017 02:53 pm
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Here's me doing The Worst Clerical Job in the World on Saturday. I look happy because [twitter.com profile] LadyPHackney, who was taking the picture, made me laugh...so it turned out okay I think.

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Don't really wanna type this all out on my phone (my touchscreen typing is getting worse lately if anything, and I swear SwiftKey is trying to make me look stupid on purpose: last night I thought I tweeted "I missed Doctor Who" but no, it said "I kissed Doctor Who" which made the grumpiness in the rest of the tweet rather inexplicable) but Andrew's got my laptop, and I've got words to get out of my head before I can sleep, so...

I should have the laptop back tomorrow. Andrew's will hopefully work with the replacement part we bought for it, which turned up today. Stuart was kind enough to spend all Friday afternoon and evening trying to fix it. He even soldered the broken part together two or three different ways to see if we could avoid having to get a new one, but his valiant efforts were to no avail. We did get through several cycles of "it should be fine!"/"no, it's fucked!"/"no, wait, this might do it!" which honestly was exhausting even for me and I didn't so anything except make the tea and occasionally hold something still. But Stuart said he enjoyed the process.

So I'll take the new part over, where I left the rest of his laptop the other day, tomorrow. But most of the rest of this week I think I'll be helping Andrew be front-of-house at the local Lib Dem HQ.

What had been a by-election HQ staffed with actual staff (and volunteers) has now been handed back to the local party, just volunteers. I was sitting in a meeting this evening thinking I really enjoyed being a small cog in the big machine, who could just do things and not have to make decisions. Now I'm the same size cog and the machine is...not exactly smaller but moving more slowly.

But we're still just as ambitious. We're focusing on getting through the original May 4 elections first, particularly because there's a council by-election in our constituency (maybe John Leech will get some company as the opposition on the council!) as well as the Greater Manchester mayoral election that day. I'd really love Andy "I'm so convinced I'll win I'm not standing to defend my parliamentary seat a month later" Burnham not to win. Particularly since he seems to have affectations instead of a personality, and his affected northernness is to hate foreigners and call coffee posh.

So anyway, Andrew has said he'll be front-of-house, i.e. make sure there's a human there all day long so when people turn up to volunteer or ask questions or whatever, there's someone who can help them. He reckons that he can sit there with a laptop as easily as here, and is pleased that something he can do will be such a big help to the campaign (most of the obvious ways to help involve things he finds hard or impossible).

But this will inevitably involve some help from me: the one part of this he will struggle with is getting going in the mornings, so I'm actually going to open up and probably do the "until-lunchtime" shifts. Starting tomorrow! So while there's more to talk about, I should try to sleep.
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I never had to navigate the American system as a disbled adult so I don't know all the details. So I'm glad [personal profile] forests_of_fire is happy for me to copy what they wrote and share it here.


I don't often make pleas to contact your Congresscritters (mainly because there is SO MUCH to contact them about x.x), but something is currently in the House and Senate that can make a huge difference in the life of disabled people.

U.S. Congress is weighing the idea of expanding the ABLE Act.

The ABLE Act set up a system that (currently) allows people who became disabled before the age of 26 to save money in special ABLE accounts. One of the bills currently under consideration will raise that age to 46. Honestly, this is the thing I'm most excited about because it means that more people will have access to ABLE accounts and I am all for that.

But this is how the ABLE account impacts a disabled person's life. They can have up to $100,000 in an ABLE account without it impacting their benefits, though they're only allowed to put $14,000 a year into your account. Once someone hits $100,000, the money will count against them. (Obviously, that's going to take a while, since you can only put in $14,000 a year.) The absolute upper limit for an ABLE account is $426,000, which would take quite a while to save up.

The money in an ABLE account is tax-free, as long as it's used for things that help a disabled person take care of their needs, remain independent, or better their life. This means the money can be used for anything from medical bills to housing to education to transportation. If they work, they can put their net wages directly into their account or they can put money in from other sources, like financial birthday gifts.

This is AMAZEBALLS for people who are disabled. One of the main problems with being disabled is that it's impossible to save money because the threshold for getting your benefits dinged is so low. Often, even working ends up coming out as a net loss, financially. Even if you don't have tons of money to sock away, being able to save money for future expenses without having to worry about your benefits is incredibly helpful. And, even if your state doesn't have its own ABLE account set up, you can apply for an ABLE account through another state. You pay a lot more in fees, but it might be worth it just to be able to put money away for future expenses.

These aren't straight savings accounts -- they're investment accounts. But you can use the BankSafe option, which means that all your investment is insured by the FDIC. That's what I use because I can't really afford to lose money. There is a small fee ($2.50/mo. here in Ohio if you live in-state) for managing the money and there's an annual fee. But it's a hell of a lot better than what we can have.

So, yes. If you're so inclined, please contact your Congresscritters and let them know you support the expansion of the ABLE Act. Also, please feel free to copypasta this to get the word out.
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I've been quiet (...too quiet) lately, but it'd be remiss of me to let a day when Paul Ryan said "Obamacare is the law of the land.… We’re going to be living with Obamacare for the foreseeable future" go by without comment.

I was terrified of the vote. Sick with it. When the friend I was visiting on Wednesday excused himself for a phone call, I typed this out on my phone and sent it to my representatives in an e-mail the ACLU mailing list had suggested I sent to my congresspeople:
I'm disabled. My parents are aging seniors, my mom particularly with longstanding health problems. My friends are poor, disabled themselves, or people of color -- sometimes all at once because that's how these things
work.

So if the ACA is repealed, I'm certain that someone I know and love will die who would not die if we keep it. If the ACA is repealed, I know that everybody I know will live in fear, suffering and misery that they won't have if we keep it.

People are kept alive by the ACA, they're kept in their homes, they're kept from that needless worry, fear and misery.

Ive lived in the UK for several years. I've enjoyed the services of a single-payer health care system there for me when I've needed it. I know this is possible. I know there's no reason for the US to be moving further away from that. It's cheaper, better care and my friends here boggle at the country I'm from being so far from having it ourselves. Please don'ttake us further still from that eminently reachable goal. Please don't make people suffer so unnecessarily.
They're all Democrats, and I was pretty confident they'd do the right thing anyway (Franken's been heart-warmingly awesome again in hearings for another awful appointee this week, which always makes me proud I get to vote for him) but I couldn't let it go uncommented-upon.

Today when I saw the vote had been pulled at the last minute, once I'd convinced myself it was for real (too scared to google in case it wasn't, I made Andrew confirm it for me) and that it wouldn't come back immediately (Trump saying he expects Democrats to seek a deal with him in a year when the ACA has "exploded" is what finally convinced me) I started crying.

I hate crying, but this was different. I've heard of crying happy tears before, and maybe this was that, but it felt more like an enormous version of the feeling I'd had on Saturday night when I thought I'd lost the keys to our B&B room so I couldn't go out because I wouldn't be able to get back in again and that this was going to be a costly and disappointing mistake to admit to our lovely hosts but then Andrew found the keys had fallen behind a table -- this on a much bigger scale, of course, but the same kind of relief. The same kind of "now I'm not being held together entirely by stress, my body must perforce collapse."

I thought of all the people being relieved and crying and screaming and hugging their loved ones and celebrating and getting drunk and remembering the people Obamacare didn't get here in time for, or the people still outside its help.

I was so fragile; Andrew had to put a frozen pizza in the oven for my dinner and my evening ended up being much less ambitious than I hoped for (I basically curled up on the couch with the dog, retweeting things until my phone's battery was just about dead and now I've come to bed but I'm writing this). My body seemed to react, after the tears, exactly like it did on Saturday and after other anxiety attacks: I couldn't get warm, my muscles were almost too weak to support me, I was having all kinds of emotions at once and had the attention span of a mayfly on speed.

Of the many, many RTs, from schadenfreude at Ryan and the other writers of this hideous bill, to the insistence that this is the best time in American history for the Democrats to push for single-payer healthcare (at least, that's what it's been called there; it looks like "Medicare for all" might be the epithet that persuades people), to the acknowledgements that we know the battle isn't over but we deserve this celebration to other badass political shit going on at the same time like a Democrat winning a state legislature seat where she had to be written in to the ballots and just more women wanting to run for office generally...I'd say it's been a good night.

It hasn't been one-dimensional celebration. It hasn't glossed over the limitations of the ACA and the people who live precarious lives even with it. It hasn't made us take for granted the sterling performances of congresspeople speaking on our side before the planned vote. It hasn't made us forget about the need to investigate the horrific numbers of black teenage girls who've disappeared recently in Washington D.C. who never get the care and attention of missing white girls. It hasn't stopped cleverly-named bills cracking down on Trump's corruption as it endangers us all. It hasn't made people stop talking about Trump/Russia or the need to impeach him.

But of all the tweets I've (html willing!) shared with you here, the one I think is most important is this:

Scoff if you must, but this is why I'm involved in politics. This is why I say that I'm proud of my Lib Dem friends, who when something angers or upsets us have a kind of instinctive reaction: let's write a policy motion about this. This is why I've been so much more active in politics (partisan or not) the last few months: it's just to cope with the increasing number of things that make me fearful, anxious and sad.

I stuck with the Lib Dems when they were adding to the things that made me angry and frustrated during points in the coalition because I knew I'd feel just as angry and frustrated but with no political outlet otherwise as I don't feel there's any other UK party that sufficiently aligns with my values for me to want to support it.* But even in things like the WI, which is scrupulously non-partisan (and, being a geographically-based way of organizing people, I'm not surprised mine is full of lefties), I feel like I'm doing the same kind of work: making the world less scary, anxiety-inducing, and saddening.

And if this kind of political event, or whatever you have in the countries you live in and love people from, makes you sad, anxious or fearful, I'd really suggest getting involved in something like this. It's heady stuff: be warned, it's easy to get addicted. Most of my Lib Dem friends have stories about joining where they didn't think much of it and ended up on federal committees, standing for parliament, or whatever. I swear Tim Farron has taken some of my lines when he talks about immigration. I have friends who've helped write policies that have ended up being the law for this country. It's pretty awesome.


* It seems to have been worth sticking around for: my pessimistic husband came away from last weekend's federal conference feeling reassured that our party's membership having doubled in the last few years hasn't made it what he feared it'd be: "There was a real, real, danger that we’d have got a lot of people who thought they were joining the Coalition And Liking Europe Party" he says, but as you can read there it's clear that the Lib Dems are still existing to build and safeguard a fair, free and open society, in which we seek to balance the fundamental values of liberty, equality and community, and in which no one shall be enslaved by poverty, ignorance or conformity.
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There's a by-election where I live. Sadly it's been triggered by the death of our MP, but he was in his 80s and had been an MP for 47 years so if ever the phrase "good innings" applied...

A week ago my local Lib Dems selected our candidate, so Jackie who I'm used to talking with in the pub about science fiction and theatre is now the face and signature on hundreds of letters I stuffed into envelopes for six or seven hours this afternoon. I did see her today but we never seemed to finish a conversation without her being dragged away in the middle of it to do something more important. She's not used to having this high a profile, but the party's throwing a lot of resources at this election, which makes it exciting for everyone and hopefully not too overwhelming for her. Still she did help a lot with this unglamorous clerical work here (though she's not in this picture).

Having helped out on a by-election in confusing distant Oxfordshire, I only have to walk two minutes down the road this time, but in other ways they feel remarkably similar. I do hope to see as many friends, and make as many new friendly acquaintances, here as I did I'm Witney.

I'm terrible at the canonical Lib Dem activity of putting leaflets through doors because I can't read street signs or house numbers, but I like doing clerical work other people find hideously tedious, because you get to talk to people. And you're never far from the tea and snacks!

Plus today there was a dog. Candidog. He's called Ozzy.
 photo 20170311_165039.jpg
Ozzy is veteran of other by-elections too, most recently Stoke, and was a very good boy, mooching around and making me smile by nudging up against my leg when I was least expecting it, letting me pet him with fingers smudged with ink and sticky from envelope glue. Definite morale boost.
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Another e-mail I've had from Citizens UK that it will do me no good to send to my own MP, some of you might find it worthwhile though:
Tomorrow MPs will debate the Dubs Scheme in Parliament. This is the Government’s chance to do the right thing.

Email your MP and ask them to attend the debate.

For two weeks our voices have been loud and clear - from Rowan Williams to Keira Knightly to Birmingham City Council, from Aberdeen to Hammersmith - we have sent a clear message: Britain is better than this.

And we know the Government can hear us - just this weekend Theresa May agreed to review the claims of 400 refugee children. Already we have made a huge difference. But we can win bigger than this.

We need to get every single MP we can in the chamber tomorrow.


Together, if we urge our representatives to show up, we can create more pressure than ever before.
Email your MP now to ask them to go to the debate and tell the Government to keep the Dubs Scheme open.
hollymath: (Default)
The other day, Citizens UK e-mailed encouraging people to get in touch with their local councillors to try to get individual cities to do what the government won't do as a whole and continue the Dubs scheme for refugee children. You can write to yours with WriteToThem. I've just written to mine, based partly on their template.
I am deeply concerned at the news that the Government plans to close the Dubs scheme for unaccompanied child refugees by the end of the financial year, and am writing to ask for your leadership.

Last year the British government accepted Lord Dubs’ amendment to the Immigration Act, which established a safe route to sanctuary in the UK for unaccompanied children. At the time, many councils supported the call and pledged to work with Government to establish the scheme.

Manchester really should be one of those. I see "Refugees Welcome" signs all around Levenshulme, from Inspire to spray-painted on the path near the train station, and yet Manchester has shamefully not done its bit in fulfilling that promise.

Please help us change that by helping keep the Dubs program going here in Levenshulme and in Manchester.

Thank you.
hollymath: (Default)


I took this picture on Tuesday night, for the #loveknowsnoborders campaign, started by [twitter.com profile] ZoeJardiniere, which you can read about. It's close to my heart because while obviously I was able to move to the UK to be with my spouse, his income only barely exceeded the requirement at that time, £15,000. The current income requirement to bring a foreign (non-EU...for now, anyway) spouse to the UK is £18,600, which might not sound like much but that would've kept me out of the country for all but a few years of our marriage so far.

It's especially unfair if the British partner is a woman, a person of color, young (in your 20s, ages at which many people including us get married), or otherwise on the wrong side of a pay gap, which makes it even harder to reach that arbitrary income. (Part of the reason we ended up here rather than in the U.S. is that Andrew is more able to earn a good income than I am, which is basically just down to the patriarchy.) It's the same threshold all over the country, too, so it'd be much harder for people living outside London to clear that income threshold.

It's also infuriatingly inconsistent, not that we can expect better of our governments of course. This income is supposed to guarantee that neither the foreigner nor their British spouse need to resort to state funds -- which they're not allowed to do. But years later when I couldn't work and was allowed to apply for benefits, I found that I wasn't entitled to any income-related benefits because my partner worked more than 24 hours a week. It could be 24 minimum-wage hours a week and yet this was expected to be enough for us to live on? Even though it'd be a damn sight less than £18,600 a year. (A tweet I saw yesterday said that working full time on £7.20 an hour isn't enough.)

#loveknowsnoborders made for interesting reading yesterday, for all those who were able to celebrate thoroughly multinational backgrounds, raltionships, addresses and children, there were also people saying "my valentine hasn't been able to bring me to live with her in the UK for four years" or whatever, which my brain just rebels from being able to even imagine.

Clearly the hashtag is an aspiration and not a reality so far, but reading it gave me all kinds of feelings and I wanted to be a part of it. I didn't have the brains or energy to of a video, even if Andrew would've tolerated it which I don't think likely. So I just took a picture, where you can't hear the low in-your-throat growl he's doing, like a dog who isn't barking yet but is warning you, and tweeted it.
My husband hates having his photo taken but he hates systemic xenophobia towards me more! That's how bad it is, folks.
A decision is expected next week on what's known as the MM case, a judgment that will affect thousands of families affected by the Family Migration Rules. There's a good explanation of that case here, from last year.
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Thanks to [personal profile] po8crg for realizing the Manchester angle on this meant we could write to people locally about it. (And for sharing his letter, which he might recognize in my one!)
Last night I was at a march through the centre of Manchester where we were shouting "No hate, no fear, refugees are welcome here!" Of course I know that this is an aspiration and not a description, yet, but I'm dismayed to see how quickly we are proven wrong.

Unless we can stop it, there will be a chartered flight tonight from an airport the people of Manchester own, deporting refugees who in some cases never even had their claims processed and thus are being deported unlawfully.

You can find more information about it here: http://unitycentreglasgow.org/mass-deportation-charter-flight-january-31st/

Please use Manchester City Council's shareholding in Manchester Airports Group, who own Stansted, to prevent this flight, and any others as I'm sure the next ones are already being planned..

I'm an immigrant to the UK and I know how horrible our immigration and asylum system is. I know it's not keeping us safe, it's keeping us ignorant of what refugees and asylum seekers are actually like. Deportation ruins and even ends lives, and I don't want it to happen.
hollymath: (Default)
#Muslimban protest today.

I had a chance to make a sign, modeled on a piece of art my friend Maria shared from [twitter.com profile] MoonStoneClare:

Here's my version:

Here's me standing with a lot of my friends who were there (including a new friend I made because the aforementioned Maria who's in Swansea mentioned both of us as having been at the Manchester demo. She's an immigrant and she knows someone in Edinburgh who is from Wisconsin who's found out ways to help out there from over here so I look forward to picking her brains about that!).

And since I was holding my sign almost all the time ("You must have strong arms like a rower's!" Birgitta said at one point; I don't really but I do feel totally vindicated in not being able to be at yoga tonight!), I didn't take many pictures but I couldn't resist this sign. Birgitta told me people were taking selfies with him in a "now here's more than one..." kind of way but I thought a picture of just him was easier.

I'm really glad there were Lib Dems there, marching as Lib Dems. We did have someone yell something about tuition fees and call us pricks, but honestly at this point that seems so fucking quaint. When a Nazi's writing Trump's executive orders, I wish I had nothing better to care about than one mismanaged decision the Lib Dems had five years ago. Meanwhile we have 82,000 members, 3786 ("as of an hour or so ago..." says Andrew who found that figure for me, clearly expecting it to have nudged up another one or two since then!) in the last three months, and we're trying to save the country from Brexit which is more than you can say for the rest of the parties with more than 9 MPs (in England anyway).

Hywel made the point at Winter Strategy Conference that we should be out there doing these things as Lib Dems (at least some of the time; almost every Lib Dem I know has a lot of hats to wear: some of us were draped in bi flags today) and I find myself definitely agreeing. It feels so good to be part of a party that's got my back here as I'm watching my country fall apart from a distance and mostly feeling pretty helpless about it.
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I wrote to my senator what must be earlier this week but feels like a million years ago, after seeing lots of him being a badass at nomination hearings, particularly Sessions', just to say thanks and keep up the good work. I checked the box saying I didn't need a reply but I got one anyway last night. It looks like what he's sending to anyone who writes to him on the subject.
As a Senator and a member of the Judiciary Committee, I had the opportunity to question Senator Sessions during his confirmation hearing. That's a role I take very seriously. During Senator Sessions' hearing, I pressed him on his misrepresentation of his record on civil rights, as well as on the issue of voter suppression, and I shared a story about the impact of Trump's divisive rhetoric on Minnesota's immigrant and refugee communities. I was not satisfied with the answers he gave to me and a number of my colleagues' questions, and after careful consideration of Senator Sessions' record, I do not think he is up to the task of being an attorney general for all Americans. I cannot vote for an attorney general nominee who is not fully committed to equal justice for all, including the LGBT community, minorities, immigrants, and women. When his nomination comes up for a vote in the Senate, I will vote no.
Shame he voted for some of the others though.

And my other senator has voted for all of them so far.
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Signed the petition at www.impeachdonaldtrumpnow.org/, which you can read more about here.

Signed up to Swing Left, which seems to embrace the strategic thinking necessary for Democrats to win a lot more seats in the House in 2018. In the process I found out that mine is one of these "swing districts," which to my chagrin I didnt know. (I do have a Democrat rep, but only by 2,548 votes.) I don't know how much I can do from so far away, but one of the strengths of this is that it allows for geographically distant help...even if it's not usually going to be as distant as mine, the structure shouldn't require too much modification from me.

Went on the Women's March Manchester this afternoon. [twitter.com profile] SurvivorKatie didn't want to go on her own so asked if I'd join her. I was conflicted about it right up until I was happy I'd gone.

Bi election

Oct. 2nd, 2016 10:24 am
hollymath: (Default)
So the UK's erstwhile Prime Minister David Cameron couldn't stay PM -- as the Indepedent wonderfully said, "He had stepped down as Prime Minister the morning of the 24 June European Union referendum result after it became clear he had accidentally taken Britain out of the bloc" -- but he didn't want to go back to just being an ordinary MP.

"It isn’t really possible to be a proper backbench MP as a former prime minister," he said, even though other people have done it. "I think everything you do would become a big distraction and a big diversion," he said. "I don’t want to be that distraction. I want Witney to have a new MP..." as if a having to fight a by-election is less distracting.

So we're fighting a by-election. The Lib Dems are rallying round, to the extent of people all over the country going along to help out, donating money, or bringing/sending essentials like homemade cake, boxes of envelopes, and a sledgehammer.

Yesterday, [livejournal.com profile] diffrentcolours, Sarah and I came down for the day. It was very good of [livejournal.com profile] diffrentcolours to do all that driving to Oxfordshire and back in a day, especially when on the way his intermittent windshield-wiper problem became unfixable and since of course you only find problems with windshield wipers when it's raining, it rendered the car undriveable. On the side of a motorway.Handily, since we had to get out of the car and behind the barrier, there was an overpass to keep the rain off us. (Mostly; it was so noisy than when [livejournal.com profile] diffrentcolours was talking to his insurance people and the recovery people he had to go up to the road above us to stand in the rain just so he could hear at all.)

Here's me and Sarah, when she said "I think this calls for a selfie."And while it was cold enough for us to keep telling each other "this could be a lot worse!"...it really could have been a lot worse. The rest of the car was working fine, and [livejournal.com profile] diffrentcolours had been able to give enough details about the problem that we hoped the recovery people could get it fixed on the roadside in a few minutes. And we were a priority because we were stuck on the motorway.

And it did end up being a five-minute job, as we'd hoped. About an hour from when the wipers practically whipped off of the windshield, we were on our way again with them working perfectly.

Soon we were in Witney, where [livejournal.com profile] diffrentcolours and I soon put his sledgehammer to work, pounding stakeboards into the ground in the gardens of people who'd volunteered to have them. Other people had gotten the sort of "low-hanging fruit" and were able to do about 20 of these, we got the odds and sods of widely dispersed locations in this rural constituency ([livejournal.com profile] diffrentcolours reckoned we did about 50 miles of driving around yesterday afternoon), and we had some adventures getting lost, annoying neighbors who didn't like our stakeboard, fighting with hedges, standing precariously on walls or upturned plastic bins -- even [livejournal.com profile] diffrentcolours wasn't tall enough not to need help reaching the top of these stakeboards!)
He took a picture of me for propaganda purposes at one point, but I really like it.It was about six o'clock and we hadn't really eaten since our road-trip food that morning (banana, cereal bar, pasty, you know how it is) so we went for a lovely meal in the nearby Como Lounge nearby, and then went back to HQ to help with clerical stuff: addressing envelopes, putting double-sided tape on window posters...not glamorous stuff but it makes a difference. I think a lot of people find it dull but it's my favorite kind of Lib Dem work really; more blind-friendly than most of it, there are usually people to chat to (or in my case usually, listen to as they're telling each other horrible puns or getting into weird conversations about past, present or hypothetical legal/political situations...normal Lib Dem stuff).

Soon enough all the locals and people staying overnight were going to the pub, and sadly we had to go back to Manchester. But not before one more photo was taken!

I'd seen someone on Twitter refer to this -- a mere spelling infelicity rather than a knowing pun -- as a bi election, so I'd said it would be when we were there, etc, and tagged all my tweets about the day with #bielection. So [livejournal.com profile] differentcolours brought along a bi flag and...Neil, who took that picture, said "If I put this on Facebook are you going to make some horrible pun about it?" and I don't know if it was a request or something he dreaded.

But of course we did!

The drive back to Manchester was thankfully less eventful than the one there had been; I got dropped off at home about sixteen hours after I'd been picked up. A long day but we all loved it, were sad we couldn't stay over, and are seriously wondering if we can make it to Witney again before the election.

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